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Does Main Street Need a Wall Street Strategy?

Does Main Street Need a Wall Street Strategy?

| December 07, 2020
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As Wall Street pushes higher, a pandemic-weary Main Street is relearning how to manage cash flow with the hope of keeping its retirement dreams alive.

Self-employed Americans, and the people working for them, account for roughly 30 percent of the nation’s workforce.1

In the best of times, putting aside money for retirement was a challenge for this group. Before the pandemic, just 13 percent of people who run a single-person business set aside money in a workplace retirement plan. By comparison, 72 percent of people in large companies participate in retirement plans.2

In recent weeks, the Dow Jones Industrial Average crossed 30,000 for the first time. And this year, the Standard & Poor’s 500 index has picked up more than 10 percent through November. But some self-employed Americans are just reading about the rally, not participating.3,4

There’s no shortage of retirement plan choices and programs. But the uncertain outlook has forced many to build larger-than-normal cash reserves to help manage through any operating restrictions or shutdowns.5

If you’re a self-employed business owner who’s struggling with managing cash flow while keeping an eye on your future, please give us a call. We may offer some guidance on how to set priorities so both goals can be within your reach.

1. Pew Research Center, August 29, 2019

2. CNBC.com, September 12, 2019

3. The Wall Street Journal, November 25, 2020

4. Yahoo Finance, November 30, 2020

5. CNBC.com, September 4, 2020

This article is for informational purposes only and is not a replacement for real-life advice, so make sure to consult your tax, legal, and accounting professionals before modifying your retirement strategy.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is an unmanaged index that is generally considered representative of large-capitalization companies on the U.S. stock market. The S&P 500 Composite Index is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. Index performance is not indicative of the past performance of a particular investment. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Individuals cannot invest directly in an index.

Investing involves risks, and investment decisions should be based on your own goals, time horizon and tolerance for risk. The return and principal value of investments will fluctuate as market conditions change. When sold, investments may be worth more or less than their original cost.

The content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information. The information in this material is not intended as tax or legal advice. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. This material was developed and produced by FMG Suite to provide information on a topic that may be of interest. FMG Suite, LLC, is not affiliated with the named representative, broker-dealer, state- or SEC-registered investment advisory firm. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.

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